Prevent

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Just Yorkshire’s false statements about Inspire

We were appalled to read Just Yorkshire’s “Rethinking Prevent” report which while claiming to be “credible,” peddled shocking falsehoods about our organisation and director, Sara Khan. The authors, Dr Waqas Tufail and Dr Bano Murtuja claimed that Inspire “were funded directly by the Home Office and managed by a professional public relations company called Breakthrough Media, despite their claims of being grassroots and independent.”

The report then quoted an “anonymous source” claiming Inspire is “managed by Breakthrough Media” and as a result have been given a media platform that we otherwise would not have had.

We reject these false and entirely inaccurate accusations Just Yorkshire have made about us.

Inspire is an independent, non-governmental organisation. We have been in existence for almost ten years; founded by Muslim women who sought to focus on the realities of terrorism, extremism and gender inequality within Muslim communities, when others did not want to. As a result and directly because of our work, we have always had interest from the media and have pro-actively engaged with them. The suggestion we are “managed” by a media firm is as absurd and condescending as it sounds.

Over the last ten years, Inspire have worked hard delivering many projects, campaigns, conferences and training programmes. As we have publicly stated on numerous occasions previously  only one of our projects, our anti-ISIS campaign, Making A Stand that we delivered almost three years ago now in 2014/5 was funded directly by the Home Office. At a time when teenagers were travelling to join ISIS, Muslim mothers themselves were expressing concern to us about the potential radicalisation of their children. Our campaign engaged directly with hundreds of Muslim women in over 9 cities. We not only taught Islamic theological counter-narratives to extremist ideology, but provided women with a safe space to talk about Islamist extremism that they come across within their families and communities.

In the period before this campaign and since it’s conclusion, we have not received any direct Home Office funding. There are many BME women’s groups who have had projects funded by the Home Office whether dealing with forced marriages, honour based violence, FGM etc. Just Yorkshire do not question the independence of these women’s groups. Nor do Just Yorkshire appear to recognise that over the years, countless Muslim organisations in our country have received Prevent funding. However highlighting their own divisive agenda, Just Yorkshire have focussed on Inspire, one of the most prominent female led counter Islamist extremist organisations in the country, which in of itself speaks volumes.

Unlike Just Yorkshire we believe, when Muslim women are seeking help to safeguard their vulnerable children from radicalisation, the Home Office has an obligation to provide such support to British BME women and their families, irrespective of their religion, race or colour.

Muslim women themselves shared the positive impact of our campaign, but despite claiming to represent BME concerns, Just Yorkshire appear only interested in reflecting the views of those BME people who fit their narrative and worldview. This is further demonstrated by the fact that despite writing about us they did not undertake the basic step of contacting us to seek to verify or corroborate the accuracy of the information they relied on to make such claims. Indeed, having interviewed many, including CAGE, whose links to prominent jihadists have been repeatedly exposed by the media, they did not contact us once, despite us being named in the report and having had first-hand experience, both positive and negative, of delivering a Prevent- supported project. We believe therefore that this ‘report,’ rather than being neutral or independent, was intended to be biased and prejudicial and was undertaken in order to advance pre-conceived agendas.

Inspire is a counter-extremism and human rights organisation. We recognise that terrorism and Islamist extremism pose a threat to the right to life, women’s rights, gay rights, minority rights, cultural rights and freedom of expression. We fundamentally believe in order to counter extremism and terrorism, human rights must be the prism through which we do it. This is demonstrated extensively through our work. It is why for example, we gave evidence to the Joint Committee on Human Rights on our opposition to the Government’s proposed Counter-Extremism Bill. It is why we have campaigned in support of the Human Rights Act, when the Government threatened to scrap it. Just Yorkshire however, appeared not to mention this in their ‘report’ as it would have laid bare the flaws in their own argument about our organisation.

While claiming to be a human rights organisation and a champion for BME people, Just Yorkshire sought to malign and discredit not only an independent Muslim women’s organisation and our human rights, equality and media work, but the voices of the many academics, think-tanks, counter-radicalisation experts and activists who agree with us. While lamenting “the good Muslim, bad Muslim narrative,” a narrative we have never used, Just Yorkshire ironically themselves engage in and promote this binary discourse by implying that we, as an organisation that counters Islamist extremism, are “bad Muslims.”

The Inspire Board

29th August 2017

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First published October 2016 on the London School of Economics (LSE) website

Despite the government engaging with hundreds of mosques, community organisations and faith organisations in the last year, many Muslim organisations do not want to publicise the fact that they support Prevent. Sara Khan argues that this is because of a loud anti-Prevent lobby that is dominating the discourse on Prevent and vilifying those Muslim organisations that do engage with it. Khan argues that a far more complex and nuanced picture exists amongst British Muslims than is commonly presented. 

I have lost count the number of articles, academic blogs and assumptions that are made about Prevent, in particular that the “Muslim community” opposes it.  Not only is the use of the term “Muslim community” problematic – ignoring the rich diversity in thought, belief and practice of Britain’s three million Muslims – but it is also simply not true that all Muslims do oppose Prevent.

The at time lazy and uninformed debate around Prevent is in part a result of our post-truth society, where, as Kathryn Viner, editor of the Guardian once wrote we should be concerned about how technology and social media now has the ability to disrupt the truth.  Does the truth matter anymore, she argues, where “outlandish claims are published on the basis of flimsy evidence,” and when “a fact begins to resemble whatever you feel is true it becomes very difficult for anyone to tell the difference between facts that are true and “facts” that are not.”

There is no greater example of this than the EU referendum campaign which was repeatedly marked by lies and misinformation.  But I have seen how, through a combination of technology, ideologically driven activists, fervent anti-establishment sentiment and a lack of balanced media reporting, Prevent – and indeed many Muslim groups who support Prevent – have become victims of our post-truth society.

Last month Tariq Ramadan wrote in the Guardian that the government’s counter-terrorism strategyPrevent is flawed because it is based on “a process through which individuals pursue a continuing trajectory, leading from a “moderate” understanding and practice of religion, to an increasingly violent or extremist involvement.”  Ramadan is referring to the oft-repeated claim that Prevent is based on the so-called “conveyor belt” theory of radicalisation.  In an article for the Independent last year, Rabah Kherbane wrote “our government’s current anti-radicalisation strategy is based entirely on the premise of a so-called “conveyor belt theory”. The Home Office vouches for this theory, and it forms the basis of the government’s flagship counter-terrorism policy Prevent.”

Yet despite these claims not being based on fact or truth they have been repeatedly stated.  Nowhere in the Prevent strategy is there support for the conveyor belt theory let alone that the Home Office “vouches” for it.  Instead the government has made it clear in official documents that there is “no single way of identifying who is likely to be vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism.”  Factors, the guidance goes on to say, are wide and varied and can include bullying, family tensions, personal or political grievances among others.  The Security Minister, Ben Wallace MP, in response to Ramadan’s claim argued that “the Prevent strategy has never conflated religious practice with radicalisation.”

But the damage by such articles are already done; the myth, one of many, is spread widely on social media and becomes cemented in the mind of many as fact. The Independent comment piece noted above for example was shared four thousand times. Technology is used to spread myths, in an unprecedented way to an unsuspecting audience, who then end up conflating this untruth as fact.

In my book The Battle for British Islam: Reclaiming Muslim Identity from Extremism, I highlight such concerns. While there are legitimate concerns about the delivery and effectiveness of Prevent, I evidence how British Islamist organisations have led on delivering a highly effective campaign in deliberately misinforming not only British Muslims but wider society about what Prevent is and is not.  These Islamists have not only partnered with teaching unions, students, lawyers, teachers and academics in an attempt to end Prevent, they have sought to malign the many Muslim organisations who do support it creating a “toxic” climate where many Muslims do not want to openly admit their support for Prevent.  As a result the loud anti-Prevent lobby end up dominating the discourse – and narrative about Prevent.

There are valid reasons why many Muslim organisations do not want to shout from the rooftops their support for Prevent, despite the fact that the government has engaged with 372 mosques, 385 community organisations and 156 faith organisations in the last year. Many of these Muslim groups, doing important counter-narrative and CVE work, are vilified because of the opposition by Islamist groups to this area of work. They are labelled as “native informants” and “sell outs.”  These counter-radicalisation groups, including my own, have been declared “apostates” “government spies” and “traitors” by Islamists precisely because of our anti-extremism work.  Yet in an era of ISIS radicalisation, it is precisely this counter-narrative work and partnership which is so urgent.  The Home Office reports that 130 community based projects were delivered in 2015 reaching over 25,000 people.  Online counter-narrative products to counter ISIS propaganda produced in partnership with Muslim groups and the government generated over 15 million views online in 2015. This is vital work.

Alongside this, the debate around Prevent has exposed the continuing alliance between Islamists and some on the British Left.  Together both continue to propagate myths around Prevent and equally pour scorn on counter-radicalisation Muslim groups who increasingly find themselves in a beleaguered space.  What does it tell us about the state of debate today when non-Muslim socialists openly write that organisations like mine – a non-governmental organisation founded by Muslim women – are “state sponsored Islamophobes”* because one of our projects, Making A Stand was supported and funded by the Home Office?

Our campaign visited hundreds of Muslim women in 9 cities across the UK which taught mothers theological counter-narratives to extremist ideology and how they can safeguard their children against radicalisation. Our campaign was well received by British Muslim women – whether Shia, Ahmadi or Sunni.  We delivered this campaign because of the high demand; these same women did not feel that “representative” Muslim organisations or mosques were providing them with such support.  At the same time we knew that without the government’s support through Prevent we would not have been able to deliver this campaign.

But such work has come at a price.  The vitriol, abuse and threats we – and other counter-radicalisation Muslim groups – have received from Islamists has sadly been a blind eye for many in the world of academia – and indeed the media – who instead focus their efforts on those who shout the loudest about their opposition to Prevent rather than acknowledging the far more complex and nuanced picture that really exists amongst British Muslims.  It also ignores the battle of ideas that is currently taking place amongst Britain’s Muslims.

Prevent is by no means perfect and the government’s weakness in communicating what Prevent is and is not and in reassuring the public has undoubtedly been part of the problem.  Much can be said of the government’s unhelpful focus and over inflation of its security policy when engaging with British Muslims.  The announcement of a counter-extremism bill, separate to Prevent, and the government’s attempt to legally define what an extremist is, is a policy I have repeatedly spoken out against and one that I oppose.  Such policies will not only undermine our human rights and freedom of speech, which must be protected especially at such heightened times, but I believe will also undermine our struggle against extremism which seeks to polarise our communities.

Through my work I have seen first-hand how Prevent is playing out on the ground. We need a far more balanced and accurate discussion about Prevent for the sake of truth, intellectual rigour and academic debate.

Sara Khan is author of “The Battle for British Islam: Reclaiming Muslim Identity from Extremism” co-authored with Tony McMahon.  Sara is also co-director and co-founder of Inspire, a counter-extremism and women’s rights organisation.  www.sarakhan.co.uk

*The article mentioned appeared in the Socialist Worker paper and has since been removed, following legal action

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Inspire statement on the HASC's report "Radicalisation: the counter-narrative and identifying the tipping point" released on Thursday 25th of August 2016.

Inspire welcome the HASC’s report “Radicalisation: the counter-narrative and identifying  the tipping point” released on Thursday 25th of August 2016.

The report rightly highlights that there is no single path to radicalisation and that therefore government response needs be sophisticated and multi faceted in it’s approach, both in identifying the factors and tackling them.

Some excellent recommendations are made, in particular about the role of technology and social media companies. The internet is a key tool for radicalisers and more needs to be done to win the cyber war with terrorists and extremists organisation. This also includes a more “high-tech, state-of-the-art, round-the-clock” Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU).

Effective counter narratives need to be community led and the government has worked effectively in partnership with civil society groups to make these messages impactful and strong. We agree that Muslim organisations that claim to have wide-scale influence and engagement with communities need to see it as ‘one of their primary duties’ to tackle extremism, and ‘do so much more to expose, remove and isolate those who preach or advocate race hate and intolerance’, which to date has not been the case.

The suggested rebranding of Prevent alone will not fully address those that have made it their cause to undermine its work by spreading lies and myths. We are disappointed that some within the anti-Prevent lobby are deliberately peddling untruths within Muslim communities and wider society, while offering no effective alternative to safeguard those most vulnerable to radicalisation.

Prevent is a strategy to support British citizens from being drawn into terrorism and an essential as well as valuable safeguarding measure to protect our communities and loved ones. Whilst it is not perfect, there have been no other strategies put forward to deal with the very real threat of radicalisation. We acknowledge there needs to be improvements in delivery and training and Inspire would welcome these.

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One of the three British schoolgirls,  Kadiza Sultana who travelled from Bethnal Green in east London to join the so-called Islamic State in Syria is believed to have been killed.

Inspire co-director Sara Khan discusses how vulnerable children are being targeted by radical Islamists groups, and the important work of preventing radicalisation to stop future tragedies.  With interviewer Mishal Hussain and Rushanara Ali, the MP for Bethnal Green and Bow.

You can listen to the interview on iplayer  or view the segment on Radio 4 here

First aired Friday 12th August 2016

 

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On Wednesday 12th July 2016, Kalsoom Bashir, Inspire’s Co-Director had the honour of hosting the South West launch of the new film “Left Behind” by Prevent Tragedies.  The National Counter Terrorism Policing Headquarters campaigns team’s latest film features four police Prevent Contact Officers talking about the impact on families when a loved one travels to Syria or another conflict zone. They describe the distress and heartache families go through and appeal to viewers to seek help if they are concerned about someone they know and love.

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In attendance at the event were women and representatives from a number of communities in the region, providing valuable feedback and and committing to provide ongoing support to the initiative.

The short (6 minute) film,  hosted on the Prevent Tragedies website www.preventtragedies.co.uk, has also been produced in subtitled format in Turkish, Somali, Urdu, Punjabi, Sylheti, Kurdish, Bengali and Arabic. An English subtitled version has been developed for deaf and hard of hearing communities.

 

 

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Inspire logo counter extremism
Welcome to Inspire’s spring update. The aim of this post is to provide you with highlights of Inspire’s activity and ongoing projects, as well as inform you about our future plans and events. You can email us at info@wewillinspire.com if you would like more information on any of the events and activities you read below .
Sara Wins!

The last few months have been hectic with both directors travelling the breadth of the country delivering training and other requests for our services whilst also trying to get our funding applications out to ensure we can survive the year! So a little recognition was a welcome distraction when Sara Khan, Inspire’s Co-Director was awarded the Asian Women of Achievement award for the Social and Humanitarian category.

Safeguarding against extremism

April and May has been busy on the education front working with numerous schools on how they can safeguard pupils from extremism. Highlights include Kalsoom delivering a full day conference and training in Dewsbury to 40+ head teachers and senior leadership on safeguarding children and young people from extremism whilst Sara headed over to a conference in Coventry addressing school leaders there at the request of the local authority. Similar sessions were also held at Newham Collegiate Sixth Form.

Feedback from these sessions have been overwhelmingly positive and described as “invaluable”. For example in Dewsbury, 100% attendees scored us over 4 out of 5 , 86% giving us the maximum score of 5. We also received very positive feedback from both Bristol and Bath Spa Universities for a session delivered to PGCE students.

Kalsoom was invited to address a conference at the University of Salford on the subject of counter-terrorism. Following excellent feedback from the organisers and delegates, they have requested Kalsoom return to speak at another event in the future.

As well as working with teachers and school leaders, we were also given the opportunity to deliver a full day writing workshop to female Muslim students at a Bristol secondary school on faith, women and power. It was a real honour to be able to work with these bright young women adding self esteem and raising aspirations.

Policy

Inspire continues to inform policy in relation to counter extremism and radicalisation. Notable meetings in the last few months include the Government’s Prevent Oversight Board, as well as providing evidence to the Joint Committee of Human Right and to the Liberal Democrats Liberty and Security working group alongside Lord Carlile- the former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation.

There has also been international interest in our work- with two meetings with representatives from the Swedish Civil Contingencies Group.

Partnership working

April and May saw a series of meetings with Bristol City Council and Avon & Somerset Constabulary. Although we are still in the planning stage, two new projects have resulted from these conversations. The first on the 13th of July 2016 will be a series of workshops aimed at Muslim women to raise awareness of the dangers of radicalisation and travelling to Syria. The second will be a conference in October 2016. If you are interested in attending either of these, please do not hesitate to email us at info@wewillinspire.com and let us know.

Media

Our work is being covered far and wide! We had a visit from the Italian new “Il Foglio”, you can read their coverage here .

Television de Catlunya ( Spain) also joined us at one our workshops for their documentary on “European approaches to prevent and battling jihadist radicalisation”.

Finally, you can watch Sara here during her hardhitting 5×15 speakers appearance on the challenges of our work countering extremism and fighting gender inequality.

 

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All too often, and particularly in the highly debated sphere of counter-radicalisation, there can be a tendency to focus on negatives, rather than working together on providing solutions. Since the Prevent strategy was introduced some quarters have sought only to criticise it as a policy to challenge radicalisation. At the same time, there has also been equal criticism that the authorities and civil society have not done enough to tackle the reality that some young people are being radicalised and groomed, resulting in some travelling to join Daesh and other terrorist groups, and others planning to commit acts of terror in this country.

This week the Guardian reported that Muslim groups and the government have been actively working to prevent young people from joining Daesh. The report claimed that because some groups had not publicised full details of that relationship or that the government had not named all the parties it was working with, somehow implied that the British public had been duped. Following on the tails of this report, almost simultaneously in fact, was an ‘expose’ by self-proclaimed advocacy group CAGE naming organisations that have worked tirelessy to stand up to extremists and challenge the violent ideologies propagated by groups like Daesh.

These organisations named by CAGE work to empower young people and women to be active within their neighbourhoods, aim to bring together communities for the common good, encourage young people to become involved in politics at a local and national level, and endeavour to empower the marginalised and disadvantaged. Some of these organisations have been doing this work for years and have made it their mission to care for the ‘hearts and minds’ of the communitites they serve. Having worked at the beating heart of their communities, these organisations know first hand how young individuals are vulnerable to the message of the extremists and work constructively to offer alternative views and support.

These are individuals like the 15 year old from my city of Bristol who is now believed to have become a ‘jihadi bride’; another girl from the same city who was stopped at the airport travelling to join Daesh in Syria; the young woman serving a sentence for terrorism related charges and has thrown away a promising career because she turned down help when it was offered from Prevent when those around her became concerned. She believed the lies spread by the ‘anti-Prevent’ lobby and refused to engage with the very people who could have helped her. All she was offered was help and support, and instead spent a year in prison.

‘Going to join ISIS is a fast track ticket to Heaven’ one mother of a 12 year old boy told me – after having lost a cousin in Syria he believed he needs to reserve his place in heaven, and this was the only route. His mother admitted she was at a loss as to what to say to him. Then there was the 13 year old girl that made plans to leave her family: online extremists told her she would have a jihadi hero for a husband and would live like a queen in a mansion with a swimming pool. She could not however object to being the second, third or fourth wife because God and the angels would curse her. She was made to believe this – she did not after all want to be a so-called ‘bad’ Muslim.

These are all real cases that I am personally aware of. They are not made up to peddle some kind of government narrative. My organisation, Inspire, and many others across the country are aware of the very real threat and we have been working tirelessly to safeguard not only these children but also protecting our coummunitites and country from terror attacks.

It is precisely because of Prevent that some of these young people have been supported at the time they most needed it. Of course neither CAGE nor the Guardian this week reported on the stories of young Muslims and their families grateful for the support that Prevent has provided them. Those that oppose Prevent have every right to do so, but they offer no alternative strategy to help those vulnerable people that need it the most. It is, afterall, easier to criticise than come up with solutions and work together to provide them.

It is public knowledge of Inspire’s involvement with Prevent since its inception. It is precisely because of this we have endured incredible levels of hostility and abuse by trolls who care little about countering extremism or society as a whole. In this context, it is clear why some Muslim groups might be reluctant to shout about their working with Prevent. This was demonstrated further when, after the ‘expose’ published by CAGE, many of these Muslim civil society groups were the targets of abuse and hostility specifically because of their important work preventing radicalisation. There is little appreciation of this toxic climate by the Guardian, which appears to have consciously ignored the context as well as the fallout.

A subsequent Guardian editorial on so-called counter-terrorist propaganda stated “The answer to the jihadis, and anyone else who seeks to divide society, is to uphold the values that liberal democracy relies on.” I echo this sentiment and expand on it to propose that the answer to the extremists, and anyone else who seeks to divide society, is to uphold the values that liberal democracy relies on. The Muslim groups ‘exposed’ by CAGE have willingly worked with the Home Office in a partnership, recognising the need for collaboration in countering extremist messaging that seeks to spread hate and discord.

Crucially, it is these Muslim organisations who are in reality working to uphold the very values that the Guardian itself writes about. We need to support these Muslim civil society groups and not allow their vital work to be undermined by critical voices that seek to disparage their positive efforts and tarnish their reputations. Through real world on-the-ground experience, these civil society groups know the true extent of the issues we face from extremism and are working to resolve them. These groups go beyond just highlighting problems, they are part of the solution.

Kalsoom Bashir

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After appearing before the Home Affairs Select Committee on the 17th November 2015, Inspire have provided additional written evidence.  The evidence examines:
1. Inspire’s independence
2. Evidence of some of our extensive work between 2009-2014 and 2014-2015.
3. Challenging Naz Shah’s MP inaccurate claims about Inspire made by her in October 2015.
4. Understanding the wider negative discourse around Prevent.
Click here to download the evidence submitted.
UPDATE: 
Inspire has submitted further written evidence on the 5th February 2016 to address in full the unfounded allegations repeated by Naz Shah MP in relation to our independence and transparency.
Click here to download our response

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Kalsoom Bashir will be joining Counter Terrorism Senior National Coordinator (SNC) Helen Ball, in hosting a UK-wide webchat at 12:00hrs on Sunday 08 March as part of International Woman’s Day, to discuss and take questions about the worrying trend of young women putting themselves and children in grave danger by travelling to Syria, leaving their families devastated.  You can take part in the webchat here: http://www.met.police.uk/Syria/

Kalsoom explains further why such initiatives are important:

As a parent of both daughters and sons I have witnessed this last few weeks with an aching heart  the anguish of parents who have lost children to the barbaric state ISIS.

I have seen the parents of the three young girls from London who have been reported to have left for Syria appealing for their return and this week heard the voices of the  mother and father of the convicted science  teacher from Manchester in a recording. They make heartfelt appeals to him to turn his back on those extremists that are not only persuading young people to turn their back on their families but murdering with brutality anybody that gets in their way be they men women or children.

In Bristol, my home city we have seen another 15 year old who has left, leaving behind as in all the other cases a devastated family and community.

This is something that can no longer be ignored and it is clear that safeguarding our children from extremists is not something that can be managed by police and security services alone.

Resilience to extremist ideologies must be started at home and we must begin to have conversations with our children  to protect them from the lure and pull of ideological and sexual grooming that  ISIS is using to attract victims to its cause. These victims are getting younger and will now be in a situation where they may not be able to return. This is the harsh reality.

I can only imagine the pain that parents that have lost children are going through but I can resolve to make a stand against extremism and protect my children and communities.

I will be joining  Counter Terrorism Senior National Coordinator (SNC) Helen Ball,who is hosting a UK-wide webchat at 12:00pm on Sunday 08 March as part of International Woman’s Day. Alongside other colleagues from policing I will be part of an all female panel, to discuss and take questions about the worrying trend of young women putting themselves and children in grave danger by travelling to Syria, leaving their families devastated.

We have made the following resolution:

“We care deeply about the well-being of women and girls throughout the world. We reject the degrading treatment of women by terrorist organisations. We seek to prevent the tragedies caused by it.

“We declare that women and girls should not be subject to forced or bogus marriage, raped, held in slavery, denied education or encouraged to put themselves and their children in danger.

“Men and women who do these things to others are to be condemned.

“We resolve to work together and would like to invite others who want to work with us to join us to end the malign influence and abuse that diminishes the potential and lives of women.”

Police and partners want to ensure that people, particularly women, who are concerned about their loved ones are given enough information about where they can get support. You can reach specially trained people for help and advice by calling 101. 101 call handlers throughout the UK have been briefed

You can also pledge your support on the MPS Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/metpoliceuk

We are increasingly concerned about the numbers of young women who have or are intending to travel to Syria. It is an extremely dangerous place and the reality of the lifestyle they are greeted with when they arrive is far from that promoted online by foreign terrorist groups. The option of returning home is often taken away from them, leaving families at home devastated and with very few options to secure a safe return for their loved one.

We want to increase their confidence in the police and partners to encourage them to come forward at the earliest opportunity so that we can intervene and help.

This is not about criminalising people it is about preventing tragedies…

Find out more and join us on Sunday;

www.preventtragedies.org

http://www.met.police.uk/Syria/

http://www.met.police.uk/Syria/cil-2014.htm

#Preventtragedies 2015 webchat

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On Sunday’s The Big Questions on BBC, Inspire Co-Director Kalsoom Bashir participated in a discussion about the challenge of radicalisation, the successful prevention of extremism, and the role of schools in working with young people.
The programme saw broad agreement among participants on the need to challenge violent extremism, and considered the role of teachers in identifying students’ potential of being pulled into extremism.

Drawing on her experience of having worked with women’s groups on a grassroots level across the country and as a teacher for 15 years, Kalsoom emphasised the importance of teachers paying close attention to ‘tell-tale signs’ of troubling behaviour in teenagers. ‘Teachers are very well positioned to spot those push and pull factors among young people, particularly in those vulnerable years… Schools have always been at the forefront of safeguarding.’

To watch Kalsoom discuss this issue, follow the link here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b052r2hg/the-big-questions-series-8-episode-5

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